Hot Topics Edition

Summer Break

The Green & Write Blog will be taking a break over the summer and will return in the Fall.  We hope you enjoy your summer!

The Truest Meaning of College for All

The Truest Meaning of College for All

By Jessica Landgraf If you think about a period in your life when you grew the most as an individual, discovered your independence, and started to become who you are today, it is likely to have happened during your young adult years. For many, this time occurs during, and is facilitated by, time away at… Read More »

Welcome Back Student Loan Servicers!

Welcome Back Student Loan Servicers!

By Dirk Zuschlag Over forty million Americans owe over $1.3 trillion in federal student loans. According to one study, student loan defaults average about 3,000 per day. And each year the federal government spends about $800 million to collect on that debt, principally by contracting with a “patchwork” of private student loan servicers. This is… Read More »

Looking Forward to Sleeping In

Looking Forward to Sleeping In

By Jessica Landgraf NPR recently posted a story on the benefits to undergrads of reducing the number of 8 a.m. classes they have to take. Mariah Evans, a at the University of Nevada, Reno, noticed a consistent trend of students falling asleep in her 8 a.m. classes. This trend motivated Evans and her colleagues to… Read More »

Reflections on the “March For Science”

Reflections on the “March For Science”

By David Casalaspi   On Saturday, people around the globe turned out at hundreds of “March for Science” events to protest what is perceived to be a growing disregard in American politics for evidence-based knowledge. The main event, held in Washington D.C. as a sort of parallel to the “Women’s March” in January, attracted over… Read More »

Can Qualitative Data Be Quantified?

Can Qualitative Data Be Quantified?

By Rachel Marias Education researchers are responsible for decisions and policies that shape how education functions. Researchers often collect quantitative data (in the form of test scores, graduation rates, GPAs, course enrollments, etc.) to see if policies actually work. They then collect qualitative data to examine the mechanisms behind the policies (e.g. the “how” and… Read More »

When Research Gets Misused

When Research Gets Misused

By Nancy Duchesneau There’s a comic that illustrates a phenomenon known all too well by researchers – the tendency for the complex findings of rigorous studies to be boiled down to facile comments about what is or is not true. Press releases and the media seek to pull complex findings together into sound bites that… Read More »

When Your College Roommate is a Baby

When Your College Roommate is a Baby

By Jessica Landgraf At the end of last week, The Chronicle of Higher Education released a special report titled “College, With Kids.” This report is a collection of four articles focused on the increasing number of college students who have young children and the unique challenges they face. While there are several colleges across the… Read More »

Ratings Revelations from the First Batch of State ESSA Plans

Ratings Revelations from the First Batch of State ESSA Plans

By Dirk Zuschlag          Although the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) rolls back federal education mandates to allow states more authority over their accountability systems, it nonetheless requires that the Secretary of Education approve each state’s accountability plan to be implemented in the 2017-18 school year. Under an Obama Administration policy, states (and Washington, DC) could… Read More »

New York Takes the Lead

New York Takes the Lead

By Jessica Landgraf At the end of last week the New York state legislature passed a state budget, which will include tuition-free college at the state’s public colleges and universities. The plan is to phase in the program by first waiving tuition for students from families with incomes up to $100,000 during the initial year,… Read More »